Andrew Ward

Call 2000

ward@exchangechambers.co.uk

"He is an accomplished junior who is a pleasure to work with and has a keen eye for detail."

Chambers and Partners 2019
Photo of Andrew Ward

Inquests

Andrew is experienced in representing the deceased’s family or other Interested Persons at inquests.

In his inquest work, Andrew draws upon his expertise in medical and healthcare issues deriving from his practice as a leading personal injury junior.

He adopts a sensitive and empathetic approach to inquest work, but is robust when necessary.

Andrew is a member of the Attorney-General’s Regional A Panel of Junior Counsel to the Crown. In this capacity, he has significant experience in representing the Ministry of Justice at Article 2 compliant jury inquests touching upon deaths in prison custody.

Inquests Cases

Andrew’s recent inquest work includes the following:-

  • During June and July 2018, Andrew represented the Ministry of Justice on behalf of the Prison Service during a two-week Article 2 compliant jury inquest arising from a death in custody at H.M.P. Hindley.
  • Andrew represented a healthcare provider at a two-week Article 2 compliant jury inquest in July 2017 arising from a death in custody.
  • Andrew represented the Ministry of Justice on behalf of the Prison Service and the National Probation Service at a five-day Article 2 compliant jury inquest during April 2017 arising from the death of a prisoner who had absconded from Approved Premises shortly after being released from prison on licence. The narrative conclusion made no criticism of Andrew’s clients and the Coroner declined to make a report under Rule 28 to prevent future deaths.
  • During January 2017, Andrew represented the Ministry of Justice on behalf of the Prison Service at an inquest arising from a death in custody at H.M.P. Liverpool in February 2015. The Article 2 compliant jury inquest concluded that the cause of death was unascertained. No criticism of Andrew’s client was made.
  • Andrew successfully represented a prison officer at a four-week jury inquest that took place in Liverpool during March 2015. The narrative conclusion made no criticism of Andrew’s client.
  • In November 2014, Andrew represented the parents of a newly-born baby who died from ischaemic hypoxic encephalopathy shortly after being born. The inquest heard evidence concerning the mother’s poorly controlled diabetic condition; the causal nexus between this and the death; and the procedures in place to monitor the mother’s diabetic condition during pregnancy.
  • In September 2014, Andrew represented a prison governor at the inquest into the death of Raymond Morris in custody. Raymond Morris was convicted of the 1967 murder of schoolgirl Christine Darby and became known as the notorious Cannock Chase murderer.
  • In August 2014, Andrew represented a prison governor at the inquest into the death of a prisoner due to his refusal to take medication. Given the evidence that the prisoner had received counselling and support from the prison’s medical wing in respect of his decision, and had the capacity to make the decision, a conclusion of death by natural causes was reached.
  • In July 2014, Andrew represented the parents at the inquest into the death of their newly-born child from ischaemic hypoxic encephalopathy due to suffering bradycardia (fetal distress) shortly prior to being born. Issues arose as to the frequency of fetal heart-rate monitoring and the causal nexus between heart-rate monitoring and the development of bradycardia.